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Tag: social class

“Dear Evan Hansen” Challenges Millennial Myths, at The Curran, S.F.

“Dear Evan Hansen” Challenges Millennial Myths, at The Curran, S.F.

Benj Pasek & Justin Paul Make Music for Harsh Times by Rachel Norby and Barry David Horwitz The plot of “Dear Evan Hansen” could be a teenie bopper movie: boy makes up story, the lies spin out of control, he comes clean. But this multiple Tony Award winning musical phenomenon has a Dickensian theme: Poor, invisible Evan ingratiates himself with the wealthy family of a classmate who has committed suicide. With a top-notch cast and a flashing backdrop of floating…

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“Mary Poppins” Inspires Rich & Poor, at S.F. Playhouse

“Mary Poppins” Inspires Rich & Poor, at S.F. Playhouse

Millennial Notes Susi Damilano Delivers a Poppin’ Nanny for the Ages by Rachel Norby and Tyler Jeffreys P.L. Travers’ quirky, beloved English governess, Mary Poppins (commanding El Beh) takes a sharp, new turn in director Susi Damilano’s staging. When Mary sings “The whole bloomin’ Empire,” she reminds us that the British Empire was ruling the world in 1900. Mary’s natural alliance with Bert the Chimney Sweeper (swaggy Wiley Naman Strasser) defines a new “Poppins.” Unlike the Disney movie, this “Mary…

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“Two Mile Hollow” Ridicules Ruling Class, at Ferocious Lotus, S.F.

“Two Mile Hollow” Ridicules Ruling Class, at Ferocious Lotus, S.F.

Winkler Throws Privileged Whites to the Birds by Susan Dunn Leah Nanako Winkler is on a mission.  She’s tired of the old theater formulas:  white folks sitting around the dinner table airing their angst, exploding their family myths, and then closing ranks against any outsiders. In “Two Mile Hollow,” affluent whites are targets of satire with a double twist: Asian actors play exaggerated versions of all the white folks. Winkler pursues the privileged Upper Crust portrayed in “white people by…

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“A Streetcar Named Desire” Spellbinds, Chills, at African American Shakespeare. S.F.

“A Streetcar Named Desire” Spellbinds, Chills, at African American Shakespeare. S.F.

Millennial Notes Tennessee Williams Disrupts Sex and Class  by Gilad Barach The African American Shakespeare Company’s “A Streetcar Named Desire” is simply a masterpiece. Tennessee Williams would applaud too.  L. Peter Callender’s “Streetcar” goes beyond “Desire” to examine gender, alienation, class conflict, and sexual exploitation. We are captivated by Blanche’s wandering entrance and her tragic exit. Director Callender offers a brilliant and painful lesson about listening respectfully to women. His “Streetcar” (1947) mixes brilliant acting, handfuls of unexpected laughter, a…

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