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Tag: poverty

“dirty butterfly” Destroys and Rebuilds, at Anton’s Well, Berkeley

“dirty butterfly” Destroys and Rebuilds, at Anton’s Well, Berkeley

Millennial Notes debbie tucker green Tears Down Our Walls  by Beau McGlasson Debbie tucker green has a trans-formative vision of London. She sees the tenements of London as flat and exposed, offering no privacy or quiet for their residents. In “dirty butterfly,” green discards the pretense of physical walls and focuses on unseen forces that contain her characters tighter than walls ever could. Green drops us into a cramped London apartment building where a woman named Jo (Kim Donovan) is…

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“Dead and Breathing” Turns Toward Life, at Rhino, S.F.

“Dead and Breathing” Turns Toward Life, at Rhino, S.F.

Chisa Hutchinson Celebrates Two Black Women in Crisis by Barry David Horwitz Two black women are struggling over life and death. One is a wealthy woman in hospice care who is dying of cancer. She can’t die fast enough for to suit herself, so she tries to get help from her nurse. Her nurse, Veronika Fern, is a god-fearing Christian young woman, who works hard and has no time for a self-indulgent slouch like Carolyn. They form an ill-matched pair—but…

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“#Get Ghandi” Amuses & Bewilders, at Z Space, S.F.

“#Get Ghandi” Amuses & Bewilders, at Z Space, S.F.

Millennial Notes Anne Galjour Examines First World ‘Feminism’ by Evelyn Arevalo   Anne Galjour does not shy away from revealing the dark secrets of Mahatma Gandhi in her new, intense comedy “#GetGandhi, A Seriously Radical Feminist Comedy.” Gandhi, who has inspired generations with his principle of non-violent civil disobedience, committed some shady acts against women. Though Gandhi practiced celibacy, he actively persuaded young women to lie naked next to him, to test his piety. Although Gandhi’s misogyny and racism seem…

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“Two Mile Hollow” Ridicules Ruling Class, at Ferocious Lotus, S.F.

“Two Mile Hollow” Ridicules Ruling Class, at Ferocious Lotus, S.F.

Winkler Throws Privileged Whites to the Birds by Susan Dunn Leah Nanako Winkler is on a mission.  She’s tired of the old theater formulas:  white folks sitting around the dinner table airing their angst, exploding their family myths, and then closing ranks against any outsiders. In “Two Mile Hollow,” affluent whites are targets of satire with a double twist: Asian actors play exaggerated versions of all the white folks. Winkler pursues the privileged Upper Crust portrayed in “white people by…

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