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Tag: death

“Seen/By Everyone” Lyrically Dissects Online Grief, at Yugen, S.F.

“Seen/By Everyone” Lyrically Dissects Online Grief, at Yugen, S.F.

Millennial Notes     Nick Ishimaru Directs a Poem to Digital Death by Evelyn Arevalo If we die tomorrow, how do we consolidate our images: the one our friends and family will have? Who will hear the messages on our Instagram, on Facebook? Director Nick Ishimaru beautifully dissects death in the digital age, providing insights into public expressions grief. In Theatre of Yugen’s “Seen/By Everyone,” we are immersed in a dimly lit bar that represents the digital world. Seven figures stand…

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“Dead and Breathing” Turns Toward Life, at Rhino, S.F.

“Dead and Breathing” Turns Toward Life, at Rhino, S.F.

Chisa Hutchinson Celebrates Two Black Women in Crisis by Barry David Horwitz Two black women are struggling over life and death. One is a wealthy woman in hospice care who is dying of cancer. She can’t die fast enough for to suit herself, so she tries to get help from her nurse. Her nurse, Veronika Fern, is a god-fearing Christian young woman, who works hard and has no time for a self-indulgent slouch like Carolyn. They form an ill-matched pair—but…

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“Everybody” Speaks Boldly, Beautifully, at Cal Shakes, Orinda

“Everybody” Speaks Boldly, Beautifully, at Cal Shakes, Orinda

Jacobs-Jenkins’ Modern Morality Stirs Our Souls by Barry David Horwitz “Everybody” puts our isolated lives on the griddle. Britney Frasier, a brilliant and baffling God, puts us all in our places. Then she sends Death to find Everybody, who screwed up her/his Life. Playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins up-dates the morality play “Everyman,” creating a parable of our privatization of Hope. In a turquoise sweater, Frazier/God authoritatively directs Death (bedeviled Victor Talmadge) to pluck five “Somebodies” from the amphitheater.  Death is hiding out,…

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“Marjorie Prime”—Memories Come Alive, but May Not Be True, at MTC

“Marjorie Prime”—Memories Come Alive, but May Not Be True, at MTC

Jordan Harrison’s Poignant Questions Take High-Tech Form by Pamela Feinsilber Jordan Harrison’s 2015 Pulitzer-finalist play “Marjorie Prime” opens with a living room conversation between Marjorie, in her ancient, tattered armchair, and Walter, on a sleek, narrow sofa. Although Marjorie is in her eighties and Walter is about 30, it’s soon apparent that they are looking back on their marriage. Walter is a Prime, a computer-generated holographic being who exists to learn and then share Marjorie’s memories with her. Since Marjorie…

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