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Category: Reflections

Feature articles on theater today.

“Fairview” Takes Back Black Culture, at Berkeley Rep

“Fairview” Takes Back Black Culture, at Berkeley Rep

Millennial Notes  Jackie Sibblies Drury Invents New Poppin’ Style by Tyler Jeffreys “I think we live in a world that enjoys Black Culture and dislikes Black People.”                                                                                    –Cecil Emeke, filmmaker “Fairview” breaks all the drama rules. In her brilliant play, Jackie Sibblies Drury finally figures out how to wake up White America to their meddling in Black culture—in a shocking new way! When you see a Black movie or a Black play, what do you expect? Unless it’s aimed…

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“White” Unleashes Hidden Voices, at Shotgun, Berkeley

“White” Unleashes Hidden Voices, at Shotgun, Berkeley

Millennial Notes James Ijames  Leaves Us Hungry for Color by Evelyn Arevalo “White” explores how white men–including gay white men–have consistently engaged in stereotyping Black women. Case in point: Imitators regularly profit by stealing the mannerisms of Black women by “acting Black.” It’s so typical that we even have a name for it: Culture Vultures. Our lead character Gus (believable Adam Donovan), an aspiring painter,  is magically visited by a silvery, sequined Diana Ross. His Divine Diana (dynamic Santoya Fields)…

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“Why I Died, a Comedy!” Internalizes Humor, at PlayGround, S.F.

“Why I Died, a Comedy!” Internalizes Humor, at PlayGround, S.F.

Millennial Notes Katie Rubin makes Spirituality Funny by Tyler Jeffreys “Why I Died, a Comedy!” takes us on the spiritual journey of director, comedian, writer, and actress Katie Rubin. Rubin sees herself die, and begins life anew, with her ego at bay.Now, she is Love, coming from deep down.According to Rubin, Love connects us all. Katiek Rubin makes the abstract concept real, with a gripping comedic flare. She skillfully portrays characters who narrate the story of her ego’s death. There’s…

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“Not A Genuine Black Man”: Wit and Warmth, at The Marsh, S.F.

“Not A Genuine Black Man”: Wit and Warmth, at The Marsh, S.F.

Millennial Notes Brian Copeland: A Genuine Black Genius by Wes Adrianson and Barry David Horwitz With the recent bigoted demonstrations in Charlottesville, anti-Black racism and white nationalism has reached a new peak. Racism has always existed in America—but the current President has charged the bigotry with new energy. Black and white identities are under a heightened collective awareness. Brian Copeland’s “Not A Genuine Black Man” reminds us of our nation’s history through Copeland’s personal history. Copeland weaves together anecdotes about…

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