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Author: Tyler Jeffreys

“Graveyard Shift” Digs Up Texas Terror, at S.F. Playhouse

“Graveyard Shift” Digs Up Texas Terror, at S.F. Playhouse

Millennial Notes Korde Arrington Tuttle Blends News & Poetry by Tyler Jeffreys  “Graveyard Shift” shows us just how awkward it is for us “all to just get along.” We see a Black couple from Chicago and a White couple from Texas–both dancing to Bobby Schmurda’s gangsta song “Hot Nigga.” Playwright Korde Arrington Tuttle is toying with my mind, and his odd style reels me in. When I see the two White police officers, Elise (innocent Amanda Farbstein) and Brian (sulking…

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“Fairview” Takes Back Black Culture, at Berkeley Rep

“Fairview” Takes Back Black Culture, at Berkeley Rep

Millennial Notes  Jackie Sibblies Drury Invents New Poppin’ Style by Tyler Jeffreys “I think we live in a world that enjoys Black Culture and dislikes Black People.”                                                                                    –Cecil Emeke, filmmaker “Fairview” breaks all the drama rules. In her brilliant play, Jackie Sibblies Drury finally figures out how to wake up White America to their meddling in Black culture—in a shocking new way! When you see a Black movie or a Black play, what do you expect? Unless it’s aimed…

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“Baby Doll” Teases Out Tense Truths, at Shelton Theater, S.F.

“Baby Doll” Teases Out Tense Truths, at Shelton Theater, S.F.

Millennial Notes Tennessee Williams & Will Marchetti Toy with Our Senses   by Tyler Jeffreys Tennessee Williams should be required reading–like Shakespeare. Williams asks primal, fundamental questions about women and men that still confuse us. Director Will Marchetti goes straight for the jugular in his unapologetic version of Williams’ “Baby Doll.” Twenty years old and stuck in an arranged marriage with crude Archie Lee (raw Matt Shelton), Baby Doll (sensual Briana Walsh)  is still holding on to her virginity. Even…

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“for colored girls” Unifies & Sanctifies, at African American Shakes, S.F.

“for colored girls” Unifies & Sanctifies, at African American Shakes, S.F.

Millennial Notes Ntozake Shange Brightens Colorful American Souls by Tyler Jeffreys “for colored girls” feels like a healing session for the oppressed woman–not a show. Even the White women in the audience snap their fingers, relating to their darker sisters. “for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf,” like the “Vagina Monologues,” is a series of  soliloquies pieced together. Each woman tells her story while the rest of the ensemble nods and “mmhmms” in agreement….

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