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Author: Svea Vikander

“Women Laughing Alone with Salad” Gets Salty, at Shotgun Players, Berkeley

“Women Laughing Alone with Salad” Gets Salty, at Shotgun Players, Berkeley

In a New York City nightclub, Guy watches sultry Meredith (compelling Regina Morones) gyrate and dance. She’s grinding, showing off her curves in a futile attempt to shed her heteronormative shackles. Wouldn’t it feel good to dance like no one’s watching? And isn’t that what we’re always telling each other?

♦ “Angels in America”—Flying on a Thread, at Berkeley Rep

♦ “Angels in America”—Flying on a Thread, at Berkeley Rep

Millennial Notes Tony Kushner Wants Us to See the Wires—Why?  by Svea Vikander Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes I’ve been thinking about hanging. Well, suspension. What it means to be strung up, floating, above the ground, a lady crooning on a swing, a baby cradled on a tree branch, an angel suspended in a harness by wires. In the Bay Area, suspension (the BDSM kind) is as common as kombucha. But in Tony Kushner’s Angels in…

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“Berkeley Dance Project 2018” Takes Us Inside, at Playhouse, U.C., Berkeley

“Berkeley Dance Project 2018” Takes Us Inside, at Playhouse, U.C., Berkeley

CAL Choreographers Move Us Closer Together by Svea Vikander The stage has always been a place where gender can flow a bit more freely and in which collective desires take reign. In four individually choreographed pieces, the dancers of the Berkeley Dance Project let us imagine a world of exuberant non-conformity. They ask us to consider new ways of thinking of gender, bodies, caring work, and intimacy. And they make all of this—and back bends, and shoulder lifts, and tenderness—look…

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“Partition” Exposes Dirty Math of Colonialism, at Indra’s Net, Berkeley

“Partition” Exposes Dirty Math of Colonialism, at Indra’s Net, Berkeley

Director Bruce Coughran Invites Us to Pity Genius by Svea Vikander and Edward Boyda “Partition” is not a play about math. Director Bruce Coughran has made mathematics into a language and a backdrop on which to tell the story of the relationship between the brilliant Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan (Heren Patel) and his mentor, British professor G. H. Hardy (Alan Coyne).  A shared obsession and tenderness draw the uptight Hardy and spiritual Ramanujan together, even as culture, colonial power, and…

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