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Author: Kim Waldron

“Avenue Q” Spices Up the Holidays, at NCTC, S.F

“Avenue Q” Spices Up the Holidays, at NCTC, S.F

Lopez & Marx’s Adult Sesame Street Meets Queer Musical by Kim Waldron “I love the lively ones,” said my friend, after seeing “Avenue Q.”  She’s right. Spirited and profane, with smart lyrics, this musical pleases everyone—except The Grinch and Ted Cruz. For some an adult parody of “Sesame Street” seems an odd staple for the holidays. Yet opening night was sold out for this, the sixth consecutive December of “Avenue Q” at New Conservatory Theatre Center, a true San Francisco…

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“Topdog/Underdog”—Taut and Absorbing, at Ubuntu, Berkeley

“Topdog/Underdog”—Taut and Absorbing, at Ubuntu, Berkeley

Suzan-Lori Parks Sings a Layered Tale by Kim Waldron It’s the rhythm, the music in the language, that captures us. A young man piles up milk crates, tops them with flat cardboard, and lays down three slightly bent cards. He picks up one card in one hand and two cards in the other, and throws them down in new positions—all the while chanting.  The rhythmic language of Three Card Monte grabs us: “Watch me close watch me close now: who-see-thuh-red-card-who-see-thuh-red-card?…

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“The Congresswomen” Take Charge, at Exit Theater, S.F.

“The Congresswomen” Take Charge, at Exit Theater, S.F.

Aristophanes & Bousel Hit Home with Greek Slapstick by Kim Waldron Do America’s raging factions disturb you? Does wealth inequality frustrate you? Do you despair over absurd government leaders? Aristophanes felt the same way in 391 B.C., according to his satirical comedy “The Congresswomen.” Stealthily, Athenian women meet in front of two vibrant peach-hued houses.  They steal their husbands’ clothes, don false beards, and storm off to take over the Congress. At dawn, they elect their eloquent leader, Praxagora, head…

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“A Different Long Stretch of Earth”—New West Wrestles Old, at Ragged Wing, Oakland

“A Different Long Stretch of Earth”—New West Wrestles Old, at Ragged Wing, Oakland

Addie Ulrey Asks Questions It’s Safer to Ignore    by Kim Waldron Nimbly juggling a rifle between bare feet, 13-year-old, bi-gender Montanan Brucie puzzles over dragons while rolling along a ridge. Brucie just stole a box of bullets for the rifle, and the dragon talk reflects Brucie’s confusion over being abandoned as an infant. Brucie is fascinated by the Doomsday clock. You’d be right to worry. In “A Different Long Stretch of Earth,” history intrudes on everyone, including a fifth-generation…

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